Matt Gauthier Teaches the Flamingosis Catch

Matt Gauthier teaches us about the famingosis catch. This is one of the more challenging catches to master. Also, it has a intriguing look due to the unique body rotation involved.

First, some nomenclature. The basic osis catch is covered here. It involves catching behind the back as one spins away from the disc. A similar spinning away movement can be applied to almost any catch. In this example, Matt is showing us the flamingosis, which is a flamingo with the osis style rotation. There is also gitosis, chosis (chair osis), bad attitosis, and probably a whole host of others. So, take your favorite catch and try to add an osis to it. It can open a whole new world.

Now for the flamingosis. Set the disc up and then spin. If you spin to the left, as Matt demonstrates, then plant on your right foot, kick your left foot out, and reach behind your right leg with your right hand and make the catch. As you spin, watch over your right should as long as you can, then flip your head around quickly and watch the disc into your hand over the left shoulder. Matt points out that the motion is very similar to a phlard. So, one way to begin is by catching a pharld but move your hand to the other side of your leg. This will help you with the motion.

There are also some subtle variations here. For example, the raised leg could travel over the disc before the catch is made. Or, it could move into position before the disc is low enough for the leg to go over. Or it could never go past the disc flight path at all. All are valid but it changes the aesthetic. My guess is that, with a little creativity there are other possible variations as well. If you think of any, please share in the comments below.

 

Ryan Young Explains How To Make Your Gitis Look Great

Ryan Young explains how to improve the look of a leaping gitis. Many people learn the leaping gitis without considering form. In fact, that’s my style…for me it’s traditionally about making the catch, with no thought to it looks. As a result, I look all compact and hunched over.

Ryan takes his gitis to another level by focusing on the form. Basically, as I understand it, the goal is to keep the knees straight, point the toes and kick the back leg backwards as you leap. This creates straight lines and splayed out look that is pleasing to the eye. I am certain Ryan learned this leap in ballet and has translated it into the gitis catch. In the video, Ryan goes over warmup and how to practice the form, even before trying to make the catch. Thanks to Ryan’s inspiration, you may see me trying to improve my form.

Ryan Young Teaches How To Cuff to Flatten the Disc During a Brush Run

Ryan Young demonstrates how to cuff the disc to flatten it while on a brushing run. Often times, especially when in high speed wind, the disc will become too steep during a brushing run. This can cause the pace of the run to suddenly change, which creates break in the flow of the jam. It also can cause a loss of control as you run into or past the disc. In more severe wind, the disc can blow behind you and roll away. By using the skill Ryan is demonstrating you can maintain control and even avoid any break in the flow of the jam.

OK, so let’s break it down. There are three steps; brush to add spin, cuff to flatten, and brush to continue the run.

Let’s say you’re on a run and the disc becomes to steep. On challenge may be that it is spinning quite slowly. Of course, cuffs use a lot of spin. So, Ryan suggests first doing a quick brush to add spin. This is step one. I often do this before a cuff as well and not just for this circumstance. With practice, the brush-to-cuff becomes a single move instead of two. The key to success here is to change the height of the disc as little as possible. Think “stun it”.

Now it’s time to cuff it flat. With clock spin, touch it lightly at 3 o’clock with the back of your hand. With counter, touch it at 9 o’clock. If your hand is wet, all the better…the wetness reduces friction. However, this is not required. As you touch, slowly lift and left the disc glide. As you lift your hand the disc will flatten out. Ryan suggests slowly moving your hand towards 6 o’clock. Just remember, soft touch and let the disc glide.

Once the disc is at the desired angle, it’s time to brush it again and continue the run. Exactly which brush you use will depend the situation after the cuff. But, as Ryan suggests, this brush must happen quickly. The key here is to use this brush to maintain/regain control. It’s not about adding spin or perfect placement. Just get it back into the air where you can deal with it. And, be ready to brush with either hand, especially in a strong wind, because the disc could now be quite high in the air. Or, in lower wind it might be falling really fast so even a kick brush or kick tip may be in order. Ryan suggests trying to connect the cuff to the next brush. This is a great suggestion as the cuff-to-brush will eventually become a single move. My latest adaptation is to let the cuff turn into a guide so I can, with a single contact, flatten the disc and then push it forward gently to give myself enough time for next trick…no third brush required. 

This brush–cuff-brush skill, though not sexy, will greatly enhance your ability to maintain control over disc that’s become too steep and is starting to get away. We’d love to hear your strategies for maintaining disc control. Let us know in the comments.

Jake Demonstrates Eating Crow

Eating Crow is a third world scarecrow. First, place the disc upside down in your mouth. Bite down on it so the rim is just behind your canine teeth. Bend forward and then toss your head back, throwing the disc up with a third world spin. As it spins count the rotations to get the timing. Now, catch a scarecrow. Time the catch with the disc rotation so the it is flat when your hand arrives.

Once you perfect this trick, then next question, what trick leads up to having the disc in your mouth. If you have an idea, let me know in the comments.

 

The Hitch Turnover

Paul Kenny explains how to do one of his signature tricks, the hitch turnover. Most turnovers involve some sort of against the spin push. The push is what causes the disc to gyrate and turn over. So for a clock spinning disc, a whip over is done from left to right. The hitch turn over is different. It looks similar to a whip over. However its clock and goes from right to left. Somehow, with a little hitch maneuver Paul can turn it over in the opposite direction than what is seemingly possible. Even after filming the video and asking him questions afterwards I still do not fully understand it. I love tricks that boggle my mind. So, watch the video and explain in the comments how it works. Or ask questions and I’ll try to get Paul to answer.

The Precession

Paul Kenny teaches one of his tricks called the Precession. This trick requires two discs. It is almost like an endless cuff, where one disc is cuffing the other in an endless precession. The disc on top slides on it’s rim and rotates around and around.

To perform this trick, hold one disc with a backhand grip. Throw the other on with lots of spin at about a 45 degree angle. Then let is softly land its rim on top of the disc being held. Now rotate the held disc in the opposite direction of the spinning disc. The spinning disc will rotate it’s nose opposite of its spin direction. Keep the held disc at the lowest point of the spinning disc to keep control.

Then, you have options. Pushing upwards at the right moment can cause the spinning disc to turn over. Stopping the rotation can cause the spinning disc to grip the held disc and roll off into a chest roll or other trick. And, I’m sure there is much more to be created here since this is a new and unique trick. So go invent something cool and post about it in the comments.

Catching Multiple Discs

If you can do tricks with one disc, imagine all the tricks you can do with two or three or ten. Paul Kenny explores the world of multi-disc tricks and gives away a few of his secrets in this video. Mainly, how he is able to catch so many discs in one hand.

The secret lies in transfer. The disc is caught between the fingers and the thumb. Then it is moved and helded between two fingers, leaving the thumb ready to catch another one.

I believe Paul’s record is 9 (Paul, please correct me). How many can you catch in one hand?

Blueberry Pancake to a Goat Hair

In this video, I show off two newly invented moves. First is the blueberry pancake. This is a catch that mixes the gitis, figure four, and pancake into one. One leg is extended above the disc. One arm reaches around the leg in a gitis like position while the other reaches in a figure four position. The disc is trapped on the palms or fingers on the outer rim. Don’t grab it, just hold the trap. Now you are bouncing around on one leg. The goat hair is a throw from this position. Throw the disc in a manner similar to a two handed throw expect that the hand in the gitis position has to provide extra momentum to send the disc to your partner. The best way to understand is to watch the video. 

The Outer Rim Delay

Paul Kenny explains the Outer Rim Delay.

In this trick, you nail delay the disc on the outside of the rim. The only more difficult nail move I can imagine is a rim delay on the top lip of the disc. Anyhow, the wind can be a key factor so be sure to face the wind before you start. Then give yourself a ton of spin. Rim delay the disc so the nose is up into the wind. With your other hand put three fingers together so the finger in the center is slightly lower than the other two. Now place your nails against the outer rim. The disc should ride in the grove created by your fingers. Try to balance it there and chase after it if it begins to fall. Note that your nails will be between 6 and 7 for clock or 6 and 5 for counter.

Once you feel comfortable with this, try landing the outer rim delay from an airbrush or off of an skid or other restricted angled set. If you can pull that off you will be one of maybe five people in the world who can, and that deserves a 10 on anyones judging sheet.

By the way, does anyone know if this move has a more official name?