And then there were two

Jake and Lori jammed at our usual indoor location (Multnomah Arts Ctr) in the gym tonight. The stereo didn’t work, so we had to play to the music in our heads. That apparently didn’t slow us down in peeling out some complicated individual combos. Jake pulled out a kick series with a right, left, and heel kick to a bad attitude catch in addition to his multiple spins to catches and his signature 4 against skid moves. Being impressionable and all, Lori figured out a few against skid maneuvers herself, including a left hand set under right leg to a right-hand behind the back skid rim pull to a catch. We also spent the last few minutes of our 1.5 hour jam to video more moves to post on Heinsville web-site so stayed tuned and y’all come back now! – LD

Cove Pull


Cove Pull: With Clock spin, set the disc on the right side of your body. Now, reach behind your back with you left hand and pull the disc so it traverses behind your back from right to left, and then in between your body and your left arm. This is one of the prettiest against the spin pulls, in my opinion. Of course, unlike mine, an ideal cove would not touch the rim.

Jam Report

Today’s PDX jam featured guest jammer Mary Lowry, along with Lisa, Lori, and me (Jake). We had a sweet, indoor, mob-op session with the disc bouncing between us like a pinball on nearly every move. Thanks to Mary’s presence, we also had lots counter spin practice. Some highlights included Mary’s gracefull cove pulls with BOTH spins and Lori’s self set Gitis. Of course move of the day has to go to Lisa, Mary, and I for a sick counter co-op which involved everyone’s nails, a couple skids, and then a 4 roll series featuring both forward and inverted chest rolls. As the jam wound down, the scene was Lori practicing her kick brushes. While she didn’t hit the same right foot, left foot, right foot behind the left leg combo from the last jam, it was still a joy to watch.

What’s a reverse pull?

The reverse pulls originated from the osis concepts. To understand the reverse
pulls you must also understand the osis. There is a true osis and a false osis.
The true osis must have a leg or body part clear the disc completely to execute
the move properly. Lets take a simple one. Reverse gitis pull! I set the disc
from my right hand spinning clock under my left leg flat set placing the disc to
my left shoulder. The left leg continues to rotate 180 degrees then planting
firmly then the right leg continues the rotation in the air while your right hand
slides cross body to the gitis position while the right leg MUST go over the
disc and then the pull is achieved.

Hint> keep your chin on your right collar bone while you look down your right
elbow and your right knee for the disc and set the disc where you want it! Stick
your finger in and pull. If you can keep your right leg up and swoop into a
grapevine set to a left handed scarecrow!!! That should wooo em!

Chip Bell
#advanced

What is “Consecutivity”?

In every sport there is a target level for the highest form of play. With art there are average pieces and then there is the work of the masters. With Freestyle Frisbee the most elevated level of play is called consecutivity. It is a way of playing that takes the skill of continuation to its most difficult form. In addition to difficulty this skill adds the elements of flow and creativity into the mix, creating the most expressive and incredible forms of freestyle. It could be described as the art of combining a wide variety of difficult constrictive moves into a long sequence, effectively, with flow and precision. The goal of every freestyler should be to improve their level of consecutivity. For those wishing to compete at the tournament level of play, this would be a very important skill to concentrate on.

It has been said sometimes in freestyle that a series of moves can be compared to a written expression of words, like a sentence. Each move could be equated with an expression or word with the most basic of these termed a ‘the’. A ‘the’ is the basic in front of you, unconstricted, one handed catch, the easiest catch or form of continuation there is. In the interest of consecutivity a ‘the’ move would be the greatest detraction from achieving this high level of play. Along with bobbles, mis-hits, long pauses and drops, they are the bain of consecutivity, but in reality ‘the’s’ are hard to avoid, and they are always better than a drop (a ground ‘the’).

Consecutivity always focuses on achieving a more descriptive and complex level of phrasing. Such as, a spinning under the leg take, flat set, spinning 1 1/2 BTB pull to an under leg angle set, front roll, set, back roll, set, spinning phlaud catch. Notice that there wasn’t a ‘the’ , pause or bobble mentioned in the entire sequence. Actually the first set in this sequence was technically a ‘the set’ as it came after the under leg move. It can be really hard to weed out those ‘the’s’.

Expression is the goal of consecutivity. To express our game and share it to others at it’s highest level requires that we perform our most difficult moves in a continuously flowing format. Freestyle is an expression driven activity. We want people to watch our play and be amazed at what were doing. ‘The’s’ allow the viewer too many chances to catch their breath. We want our play to be so consecutive that their minds will not be able to keep up with the expression of difficult moves shredded out before them

Imagine someone, as they contemplate that double spinning flamingitis against pull take off of a throw we just nailed. As their mind attempts to comprehend that, it will soon tingle as we go off into a series of consticted spinning against take moves, and when we finish with a spinning crow brush set to a triple spinning crash and burn roots, their overcharged neurons will most likely erupt into a bout of spontaneous giggling. My mind got a jazz just contemplating the possibility. Everyone wants to express their game to the highest level, because it’s more fun and it looks really cool.

So then, how do we begin the process of introducing more consecutivity into our games. Fortunately, no matter what your level of play is you can work on this skill by taking the moves you already know and begin to combine them into sequences. At the beginning level this might simply be a series of basic continuation moves. Work on avoiding ‘the’s’ and other simple moves or corrections that break up flow and detract from consecutivity.

Let’s say you know how to flat delay set under your legs, do simple pulls like a behind the back, chest roll and some basic freestyle catches like a flamingo. You could put these together in various combinations without ‘the’s’, with flow and you would be increasing your consecutivity. Your combination might go something like this… Off the throw, make one turn and take the disc under your leg. In one smooth motion set the disc up flat in front of you and turn halfway, pulling out the disc with a BTB rim pullout. Fight the urge here to use a ‘the’ to gain control, but instead cleanly set the disc out head high in front of you, with a little angle for your next move, the chest roll. At the end of a nice sticky roll, push the disc off your hand straight in front of you at mid height so that it soon stalls and slopes back towards your feet, then turn and set up for a nice gracefull flamingo catch.

Note how this combination used each continuation move in a consequetive sequence. Breaks were avoided by the use of accurate sets off of each move. Each set ended exactly where the next move was to begin. Some have described this as putting the disc into the ‘move window’. This refers to the course where the disc travels on it’s route to your next planned move. Often, because of it’s flight characteristics, the disc is set out in front, usually into the wind, where it will take a predictable course back to you, giving you enough time to set up for your next move. Or allowing you to move in an easy direction, forward, to take the disc into the next continuation move. With each move requiring a set, there is a corresponding ‘move window’. Try to figure these out and form a mental picture of these ‘windows’ in the places where you’re having the most difficulty completing the move. Some moves have large windows while other more difficult constrictive moves have extremely small windows with added disc angle requirements.

Work with what you know and find ways to combine these into flowing sequences of moves. Once you have mastered a series, try to combine it in a slightly more difficult way or add other moves into the sequence. Working on consecutivity will force your game to improve on many levels. Moves will have to be performed more correctly, sets will take on greater importance, you will soon be able to instinctively improvise in moves depending on were each set ends up. Your game will grow on many fronts instead of one move at a time.

If you’re jamming with other players and doing cooperative moves, try adding some consecutivity into the playing mix. Don’t just take the pass or throw in a simple ‘the’ position, but spin into it and/or take it from a more constricted position. The same goes for passes and throws, try doing something extra with each and add some flow. If you make a difficult catch with a certain hand position, try sending off a throw using that same grip. Adding consecutivity will elevate your game and those around you to higher levels.

Difficult cooperative takes require a certain level of anticipation and the ability to rapidly commit to a particular move early as the pass is being made. Try to anticipate what is coming, but be ready for anything. On the other hand, your passes and throws to other players should be set accurately, preferably into their ‘move windows’, so that they will be able to keep the flow unbroken and consequetive. As your playing, keep yourself moving, positioning yourself in areas where you can better receive passes or do something with the disc like hoops or angle changing deflections. Moving around the disc as other players are doing moves will open up more possibilities for interaction and help cool moves to develop.

Consecutivity is a difficult challenge, but it is at the heart of expressing our game to others at the highest level. Work on it each time you play. Build move combinations that are both consequetive and difficult for you. Stretch yourself a little bit at a time, while attempting to remove the clutter of ‘the’s’, pauses and easy sets. Try combining difficult moves that you never thought of placing together. Along the way you will find other consequetive moves that can be woven into sequences that will enhance both your game and your enjoyment of the sport of Freestyle Frisbee.

Carl Dobson