How to Cove

Matt Gauthier explains how to Cove the disc. Cove is an intermediate difficulty move that is against the spin. To learn Cove you should begin by trying to crank the disc on a high angle. Once you understand the nuance of that high angle crank you can progress to the cove. Set the disc from your right hand to your left hand behind the back, then let the disc drift with the spin until it hits the crank angle and pull it through. Watch to learn more.

Paul Kenny Discusses the Whip Over – Part 2 – The Give


In this part 2 of a 3 part series, Paul describe the send component of the whip over in detail.

First is the full motion. With the disc hanging in a rim delay on your left hand (for clock, wight for counter) make a down, up, down motion as Paul demonstrates.

Second is the against the spin portion. This takes place on second down motion. So, go down, up, then as you push down again, slide your nail against the spin. For clock this would be from 10 o’clock to 9 o’clock. This against the spin motion is what causes the disc to turn over. On this motion you would also apply angular force to propell the disc from your left hand to your right hand.

In part 3 Paul discusses the receive.

See part 1 here.

Digitronic Skid

Here I demonstrate the digitronic skid, sometimes called the “skididge”.

With clock spin, start by getting the disc on a center, invert delay on your left hand. Then, let it tip to the rim. As the disc drags toward your wrist twist your upper body and shoulder to the right. As you reach your twisting limit kick you right leg up. As you leg reaches its max height, push your arm left to propell the disc under your lifted leg. Aim towards your calf or ankle. Often, my wrist or lower for arm will run into my knee. This should send the disc under your leg with enough force to reach a partner. Or, in a good wind the disc will go out and come back to you for another restricted, against reception.

This move is both an against the spin rim shoot and a digitronic (cross body, inverted hand) maneuver.

Alien Birth Ritual

Matt Gauthier demonstrates how to do the Alien Birth Ritual. This move has become legend because it has an awesome name and because very few people can do it. In fact, very few people can even describe it.

It starts with a birth. However, you pivot on the “birthing leg” to extend the against the spin pull. Then you set it up and immediately pull a juice.

It took Matt two tries to do it for the video…hence the cut.

Go against the spin

I am not certain who was the first person to get against but I feel pretty
confident in stating that if there was a record for such things I would be
the career leader. The basic principle of spin is “Natural Procession”. What
that means is when a disc is spinning it wants to go a certain way. As a
person nail delays a disc, they do so by making small circles in the
direction of the disc. If you let your hand go limp the disc will rotate
around your finger the way it is spinning. There is also an anatomical
effect in play. If you are left handed, it is easier to learn to nail delay
clock spin. To test this theory, make small circles in the same direction
with both hands. Which one is easier for the respective spins? Now, to get
against, you must learn to go the opposite way of the spin. The best way to
start to learn this is to practice the “Crank”. There are 8 cranks, 4 with the spin and 4 against. Clock
inside, clock outside, counter inside and counter outside. All delay moves
are a part of a crank, some more than others. Here’s a drill. With clock on the left hand
(opposite hand for counter) take a nail delay and hold it above your head
with a straight arm. Now let the disc down and rotate your elbow to the
outside until the disc goes all the way down under the arm and let it pass
under your armpit until it comes out in front of you. That is a clock
outside crank. Now take a nail delay (clock again) in the right hand. Pass
it under the armpit and lift it up until it is above your head. That is the
second basic crank. It is important to try to keep the disc in the middle
and to try to do it slowly. By doing that, you are gaining a “feel” for the
spin of the disc and it will open up many more moves for you over time.

Now for some keys on how to do it. Try to get the disc to do all of the
work. If you are doing the left hand crank, let the disc tilt slightly
towards you. Then let the disc begin to drop down. It will be much easier
that way. Also, don’t keep your feet still. Rotate around the disc.

Here’s some moves to try:

Cove: This is a left hand (clock) pull done behind the back. Again, try to
tilt the disc so that it is falling in the direction you want to take it.
For extra credit try getting it in the ditch (or rim) and once you get it
through, continue the move into a one-hand turnover.

Juice: This is under the left leg with the left hand. Tilt the disc towards
you, drop it and pull it through. Viola! Magnifique!

BTB Crank: Do the drill I mentioned above and at the end of it, instead of
pulling it through, take it behind your back. Remember to rotate into the
behind that back position as the disc comes around your back.

SKIDS:
Skids are against the spin moves done in the ditch (or inside rim). The
easiest way to do them is with a tilted disc.

Here’s basic Skid:
Throw up some spin with your right hand and extend your left into an
inverted wrist delay. Instead of keeping the disc on the finger, as soon as
you gain control, pull the disc around your back. Again, it helps to rotate.
Keep practicing this. You’ll start to gain a remarkable amount of control
and can use it as a set to other moves.

Skidout:
This is with the right hand (clock). Toss up some spin with and angle onto
your right hand. Freeze it, toss it up slightly then get it behind your
back. As soon as it touches your right hand finger nails drop your shoulder
and rotate around. Booyah!!

Amphibian: This is an inside crank done under the right leg (clock, right
hand). Drop your shoulders into position to get a better angle. Once you get
it down low pop it out.

WINDPLAY: If you are in a benign environment, you should be able to quickly
master some of these moves. Now to take it a step further, take it outside
and engage in some wind play. Think about where the disc is once it comes
out of one of these moves. Take the basic skid (left hand clock btb). If you
are facing the wind and do this move, it will now be behind you and you are
chasing it down wind. Now turn 1/3 towards your left. Now when you do the
move, it comes out into the wind lending itself to a nice floaty pull. Do
another skid like juice and you’ve just done skid row! Call your mom and tell her
“I’m on Skid Row Momma”!!! Actually it’s really Brain Hotel but she won’t
know the difference.

Skippy Jammer

Cove Pull


Cove Pull: With Clock spin, set the disc on the right side of your body. Now, reach behind your back with you left hand and pull the disc so it traverses behind your back from right to left, and then in between your body and your left arm. This is one of the prettiest against the spin pulls, in my opinion. Of course, unlike mine, an ideal cove would not touch the rim.