The Scoop Brush

Ryan Young Demonstrates the scoop brush. This brush is very useful for making disc steeper as a save when its too far out in front of you on a air brushing run.

With clock spin, use your right hand. Touch the disc slightly on top at about 3 o’clock. Push down and forward as the disc rolls into your hand. Then with the disc at 6 o’clock or so in the palm of your hand, finish the brush by rolling the disc off your hand while pushing upwards. This will cause the disc to lift into the air on a steeper angle, allowing you to be able to gain control again.

Kick Brushing 101, the video version

Jake Gauthier teaches us how to kick brush a frisbee. A kick brush is a air brush with your foot. In other words, you kick the frisbee to keep it in flight, changing it’s direction and adding spin as you kick it. Kick brushing is a great trick because it is hard, unexpected, and can be used to keep the disc flying almost indefinitely. It’s also a great trick to save a drop as your feet can reach farther, and lower than your hands

To kick brush, face the wind. Then give yourself a little throw with the disc nearly vertical. The goal is that the wind blows the disc back to you. As the disc nears your feet, kick it. But, don’t kick it like a soccer ball. Instead, think about the spin of the disc and try to add spin with your kick. If it is spinning clockwise, kick it at 5 o’clock and swing your leg from right to left. For counter clockwise spin kick it at 7 o’clock and swing your leg from left to right.

At first, your goal is to just kick it back up to yourself. As you get better try both feet or try kicking it multiple times in a row. Also, try adding a trick catch after the kick.

Extra credit is you can invent other ways to kick the frisbee to keep it in flight. Let me know what you come up with in the comments.

Jake discusses the intricacies of the under the leg airbrush

In this video I talk about some of the possibilities of doing an under the leg airbrush.

Airbrushing is when you hit the outside rim of the disc to keep it in flight. By performing this trick under your leg, you are adding a restriction which increases the difficulty of the trick.

Since the disc, you leg, and your hand are all moving, an under the leg airbrush can be performed at least three different ways…extra credit for listing another way in the comments.

First is where your arm reaches under your leg. The disc never actually traverses under your leg but your arm movement is restricted by your leg.

Second, the disc traverses under your leg before you airbrush it. The restriction here is the timing of the leg and hand movements so the disc does not contact your leg and so you do not air brush your leg instead of the disc.

Third, you brush the disc so it travels under your leg after the airbrush. The restriction is that the airbrush must be accurate enough and/or your leg must move accurately enough so the disc does not hit your leg.

Can you see the differences in the video? Which one do you think is the most difficult? Can you think of another way to do an under the leg airbrush with the same leg/hand combination?

Frisbee Tricks – How to Airbrush

Airbrushing is the act of hitting or slapping the frisbee to keep it in flight. Ryan Young and Jake Gauthier show you how.

 

To start, face the wind. Then, toss the frisbee up into the wind on steep angle so the wind blow it back to you. Then, follow the disc. When it returns to you, hit it to send it back up. Remember, the spin of the disc is what allows it to fly. So you have to swipe your hand in the same direction as the spin to keep it spinning. For a clock wise spin, aim for 5 o’clock on the disc. For a counter clockwise spin, aim for 7 o’clock. Airbrush as many times as you can, but don’t let it fall to the ground. When you feel you’ve done enough, go for a trick catch.

Throws, Catches and the basics

(PDF)

BASIC THROWS

It is very important to learn the fundamentals of throwing before trying more advanced moves. Remember to step towards your target, or at the very least to shift your weight from your back foot to your front foot while throwing. Concentrate on rotating your shoulders, hips and legs through to the point of release, and end with a natural follow through. Keep your arm straight for distance, or bend your elbow and exaggerate the snap of your wrist at the end of the throw for greater spin on the disc. Adjust the angle of your release for accurate throwing.

The Backhand The most common throw is the Backhand release. Stand sideways toward your target, and grip the disc by placing four fingers under the rim of the disc and your thumb on top. Reach across the front of your body, then swing your arm back, releasing the disc towards your target. Tilt the outside edge of the disc down slightly (approx. 30 degrees) upon release and follow through!


The Finger-Flip Stand sideways toward your target, and grip the disc by placing your thumb on top of the disc and the first two fingers in the rim. Much like snapping a towel, swing your arm along the side of your body, snapping the disc towards the target. More snap equals more spin. Tilt the outside rim down slightly upon release. Use your wrist snap to propell the disc, not your arm.


The Thumber The Thumber is much like the Finger-Flip except for the grip. Stand sideways toward your target, and this time place the thumb in the rim with four fingers on top of the disc. Again, swing your arm along the side of your body, waist-high, snapping the disc toward the target. Slightly tilt the outside rim down upon release.


The overhand wrist flip For this throw, stand facing your target. Begin with the same grip as the Thumber, then turn your arm and wrist over. With your wrist cocked backward, swing your arm above your shoulder and snap your wrist forward towards the target. Remember to keep the outside edge of the disc tilted slightly downward at the point of release.


TRICK THROWS

Trick throws can be created by modifying the throws previously described. Use momentum from spinning or pivoting to create the snap needed to throw around your back, neck or legs. Be creative and invent new throws with your friends.

UPSIDEDOWN To throw the disc upside down, use the previously shown grips. Release the disc tilted slightly upward (Approx. 30o), instead of downward.

CURVE To throw a Curve shot, simply angle the disc upon release of your throw in the direction of your desired curve. Special precautions should be made in windy conditions.



SKIP SHOTS Skip shots can be made by striking the far edge of the disc on the ground between you and the receiver of the throw. Skip shots are easiest on hard surfaces.



BASIC AND TRICK CATCHES

Catches can be made off of throws from your partner or from your own set-ups, and can be made with either hand. The disc is always spinning, so be sure to make a strong squeeze when catching. Standard catches are made with the thumb up on low catches and the thumb down on high catches. Catches can be made more difficult by spinning around before the catch is made. Below are some examples of beginning and advanced catches, but make up some of your own, that’s half the fun. Catches can be made while standing, running, sitting, lying down or jumping in the air.


Pancake


One hand catch; High and Low


UTL (Under the Leg)


BTB (Behind the Back)


Bad Attitude (Around the Extended Ankle)


Flamingo (Around One Leg)


Figure Four (Reverse Under the Leg)


Behind the Head


Chair (Around both Legs)


Triple Fake (Around the Body)


Phlaud (Around the far side of both Legs)


Gitis (Around the far leg)

TERMINOLOGY

Nail Delay – Spinning the disc on your fingernail allows you to do many things. By balancing the spinning disc in the center, you can maneuver it under your legs, around your body and set it up for catches. Move your fingernail in a small circle underneath the spinning disc. Your finger should move in the same direction of the spin. When outside always face the wind.
Note: Silicon lubricant is used to create less friction.


Rim Delay – Similar to the nail delay, this technique involves letting the inside rim of the disc ride on your fingernail. Simply hook your finger so that your nail is the only thing making contact with the disc. This allows you to swoop the disc and create a flowing motion.


Spin – The disc spins two ways, clockwise and counter-clockwise. When the disc is thrown with a lot of spin, the flight will be more stable, and the nail delay will last longer. Also, the disc will hold an angle longer, and be more manueverable.

Percussion – Tips and kicks in the center of the disc offer many moves for the novice and professional alike. It is important to make contact as close as possible to the exact center of the disc. The action should be quick and precise for maximum control. Use your fingers, elbow, knee, head, toe or heel to pop the disc into play or to set for a catch. Experiment with trick tips under your leg, behind your back and with your feet.



Air Brushing – By hitting the disc on the outside rim with either the hand or foot, you can maintain spin and keep the disc in play. It is easiest when there is a slight breeze. Angle the disc upward into the wind and brush across the outside rim. The disc will rebound. Repeat the action or make a catch. Indoors, the brushing action can be used to pass the disc to your partner. Experiment with different hits and kicks into the wind or indoors.



Body rolls – Rolling the disc across your body is fun and easy. The most common roll is the chest roll. First of all, make sure to face the wind, then, while leaning your torso back and with the disc tilted towards you, start the roll at your finger tips. Step into the disc to maintain contact between your body and the disc throughout the roll, and watch the disc progress from one hand to the other.



Co-op – Passing the disc between players by center delay, rim delay, air brush, kicks or tips is called co-oping. For routines on the competitive level, these tricks are choreo-graphed to music.



Freestyle Competition

In competitive freestyle disc play, players organize three, four and five minute routines to music, and are judged on execution, artistic impression, variety and difficulty. Tournaments are held worldwide, and exhibitions can often be seen in schools and at special events.

For a complete listing of freestyle events, please contact the Freestyle Players Association at:

http://www.freestyledisc.org

Needed Equipment

For a simple game of throw and catch, a disc is all you need. If you desire to expand your play to the nail delay and other advanced moves you might want to spray the bottom of your disc with a dry silicone lubricant. Spraying the disc will make it slick and nearly friction-less, which allows for easier nail and rim delays. Another part of the equipment needs of professional disc athletes are fake fingernails. Since real nails tend to grind down with extensive play, fake nails are used to protect the real nail and give a secure surface for the spinning disc. Other than that, the only requirements for freestyle disc play are open space and you!

Text by Rodney and Bethany Sanchez

Graphics by Gina Sample

Airbrushing – or – Whiz Rings Kick Butt

When the wind is low and you want to work on your wind game, what should you do? Grab a disc and play the wind to your dismay? No….the answer is the whiz ring.

These things are great. They play in next to no wind, are very stable for wind play, and they are hugely forgiving.

What’s more is that Whiz Rings are ideal for learning new moves and teaching new players.

To play with a Whiz Ring there are a few essentials to know. The first of which is what spin you will be playing with. Got that? Now decide what direction you will need to hit the ring in order to propagate spin. (For clock spin, right to left, for counter, left to right)

Once all that is in order locate the wind and face it. Give the ring a little toss into the wind with the nose tilted upward so that the ring may return to you. The throw does not need to be very high or too far in front of you. To brush the ring you will need to hit it in the direction of the spin. For clock hit the ring in-between 4 and 6 o’clock. For counter hit the ring in-between 8 and 6 o’clock. The ring should pop back up in front of you after brushing it. It may be necessary to pursue the ring after brushing. After brushing a whiz ring a few times try a catch under the leg. May I suggest a gitus.

For low wind these things are the ultimate. They float like a disc in an 8 to 10 mile an hour breeze at the beach. The time you have to decide what to do seems like an eternity during play. It opens doors that were otherwise locked in everyday situations.

Another nice thing is how forgiving the rings are. A miss hit does not usually end in tragedy (the ring on the ground). It allows for a shorter learning curve because you spend less time picking the thing up and more time absorbing what went wrong with the hit as you try it again.

How many times have you broken blood vessels in your hands during a brushing extravaganza? The very notion turns off the average newcomer. Rings offer a safe and fun environment for new players to try brushing.

For whatever reason, people are always willing to try air-brushing. They are not always willing to try the delay. Rings offer brand new players a chance to have fun without feeling like they are busting your jam. Toss the ring up and stand next to them so that you can correct any errors, and there it is a fun way to jam for the first time. Everyone I have asked to give the ring a shot, has tried. Most have been successful.

Obviously one cannot delay a ring. However the ring forces you to learn how to depend on your wind game. I can’t say enough about limiting your scope of focus. It is for me the best way to improve my skills.

Whiz rings taught me how to chest roll. They taught me how to jelly-roll, leg-over brush, leg-over kick-brush, btb brush, scarecrow brush, and generally enhanced my game. They are hard to catch. So you know if you can catch the ring you can catch a disc. Sometimes I will jam by myself for a couple of hours with nothing more than a ring. These things are great, and I recommend them to everyone who wants to play the wind.

Matt
#beginner

The secret to Air Brushing – or – Sloppy Hands

Air-brushing is more than slapping your hands at a disc and hoping that it comes back up into play. It is an art form that only a few have mastered in the short time that Freestlye has been around.

I have been watching over time and have noticed something about the best wind players. They have sloppy hands when they are air-brushing. If you ever have a chance to watch players like Tom Leitner, Doug E Fresh, or Jake Gauthier, you will see what I mean. It would seem by watching that they should have no control over the disc and it’s flight with the way that they position their hands. It almost looks as though they have Cerebral Palsy. The hands seem to become limp and contorted. Somehow this allows for softer touch and greater precision while brushing. Adding Z’s, changing angles, or putting the disc out in front of you in just the right position. Sloppy hands are no doubt the way to go. It is the ability to adapt a soft touch with striking precision that will help you change your wind game from hopeful wind player, to Wind Jammer.

Matt Gauthier

Learn to Chest Roll – or – The Power Roll

The way I learned to roll was by first learning a power roll. I’ll explain for clock spin. First face the wind. This roll can be done in all kinds of wind, but I found it easiest to learn it in no wind. So indoors is good. Just make sure you have a high ceiling and no breakables around. It can get a little out of control. Next you need to toss the disc on a very steep angle to your left side. Then curl your left hand towards your forearm and wait with your hand down low, by your hip. As the disc comes down hit it at seven o’clock or so (this is important) with the palm of your hand. Stick your right arm straight up in the air and it will almost track itself. You might have to move your right arm forward a little bit to get it to track, but you will get the idea quick. You will need to hit it a little hard so that the direction of the disc will change from falling to travelling up your chest. As you get good at the power roll you will find that an open chest roll with no uphill travel will become easier. And if you give the open chest roll a little push with a curled wrist it will help greatly in making the disc track across your chest, because you’re giving it a direction instead of letting it roll as it will.